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that? >> here is the back. 95 percent of the consumers live outside the united states. american companies need to tap those consumers and send them u.s. products. we have to find ways to encourage that kind of trade. agreements that give us access to consumers outside of the united states are beneficial for creating jobs back here in the u.s. i look at all of the free trade agreements that have been negotiated and the ones that are pending approval as ways to stimulate job growth. there have been studies done, and there are estimates, but the conservative estimates, and president obama himself i use that number is that the agreement could generate 75,000 new jobs. those are the kinds of numbers you want to be generating. that is a conservative estimate. this agreement, i know, will create more jobs, because there is a lot of opportunities in the market that we have not been able to tap yet because of the tariff and barriers. $38 billion and exports in 2010. it is the seventh largest export market for us. can you imagine how much more that market could be? >> if the prices came d
the united states of america. in now just over 50 days ago my candidacy to be the next president of the united states of america. [applause] by the way, you probably do not know, but my name is michele bachmann and i intend to be the next president of the indicted states of america -- of the united states of america. you may have heard last saturday that there was a little election in iowa and i was the no. 1 when are in the iowa straw poll last week. [applause] we were absolutely thrilled. the victory was even more stunning than what was reported because i had only been a candidate for the presidency for 49 days when the election happened. there were numerous candidates who spent several years in iowa and spat multiple millions of dollars in a very sophisticated ground game. our 49 days included the day i announced any day of the straw poll. i spent about half the time, it seems, in washington, d.c., fighting against the premise that barack obama should be given another $2.40 trillion in a blank check to spend. because i believe that your marching orders for it is time to stop g
of the national security threats facing the united states. i remain a proponent of a strong bilateral relationship with turkey and its continued integration into europe. however, it's also important to recognize where we have differences. turkey's troops continue to patrol in cyprus. .. surge to egypt, he speaks a number of languages including turkish and arabic and finally and most importantly he is a graduate of dartmouth collagen in new hampshire. so again congratulations to all of you on your nomination and i appreciate your willingness to come before the committee. we are fortunate to have senator lugar with us. i know he would like to make a statement. >> i am pleased to join you in welcoming our nominees of three important countries and our relationships with these countries are excellent and we will have an opportunity to review events in each of the three as we welcome ambassador ricciardone, ambassador eisen and ambassador ford. turkey is the center of several issues underscoring its importance as an ally. in particular i hope ambassador ricciardone's perspective on the recent resignatio
. most people in the united states we make up our mine. we don't follow europe. >> right. well i think that's a popular myth and misconception. i lived overseas and russia until recently. one the things that occurred lot a things you see in europe are things that are ahead in some sense what you see in america. the article sit elf was prompted by the whole debate over same sex gay marriage in massachusetts that americans boy this is sort of a fau naphenomew to us. in fact the dutch had legalized gay marriage in 2001. and so in america is really kind of sense catching up so absolutely there's a valts pipeline >> you think that this values globalization is going to change the culture. >> it's already changing the culture. >> how so? >> i think that the gay marriage is another issue. yoit anyways yeah through science and technology the so-called abortion pill r uchu t was pioneered in france. there was a great deal of hostility and opposition to it. now it's come over and now it's easily available from doctor or from a clinic. there's no question we're all sort of this mainstream of weste
will not speak but be introduced. the president of united states table tennis association. the ceo of usa table tennis, a director from the state department. welcome. how what took table tennis club, and the united states olympic committee coach of the year. rose, where are you? what a wonderful party you put on last night. it was absolutely outstanding. thank you. [applause] bruce pickering, executive director of the asia society of northern california, who has helped us with the forum. the executive director of the chinese historical society. and then the libyans in the audience. if i could ask you to stand -- then, the olympians in the audience. if i could ask you to stand. [applause] thank you. willie is the president of the united states olympic alumni association, and our future olympian, who was just out here. where are you? wait to everybody -- waived everybody. [applause] we have watched her grow up, and we are so proud of her. representative of the international table tennis federation and headed junior development. now, it is my great honor to introduce our mayor, mayor lee. we are s
as the united states senator from florida. the highlight of that career undoubtedly came 12 years ago when he and -- installed made as president of the national press club. also of note senator graham was chairman of the senate intelligence committee on september 11, 2001 and chair the joint senate and green to the terrorist attacks of that day. he famously asked the question, why the intelligence committee had failed to connect the dots in light of the revealed conspiracy before the attacks? now in his book, "keys to the kingdom" senator graham bears a striking similarity to one of the characters in the book referred to once there as doodle. it connects a few more of the dots. since leaving the senate senator bob graham has served as a senior fellow at the john f. kennedy school of government at harvard university and was appointed by president obama to chair -- cochaired the bipartisan national commission on the bp oil spill ensure that financial crisis commission. senator graham will discuss his book and then we will take questions for about half an hour or whatever time we need and then h
on here in the united states and in canada, our neighbor. mr. folk, i would ask you in a speech read you for your service as a marina as well, how do you assess the effectiveness of the fbi and the doj's efforts to support al-shabaab's ongoing recruitment of muslim americans around the united states? >> thank you, congressman. i think we can look at a couple different factors to bite us in that first i believe that the fbi and the doj recognize the threat and move quickly to counter it. i believe that there is certainly an ongoing need to take care to focus on any groups that are recruiting people to fight on behalf of a terrorist organization and i believe al-shabaab is currently represents an active group in that regard, so i think the efforts need to be ongoing and we are going to need to remain vigilant to ensure that they are not recruiting. and i think that if you want to look at whether or not we have managed to stop this problem we can look at the fact that as of february, 2008 the state department designated al-shabaab a foreign terrorist organization. since that time additional
of whom were saudi citizens, came into the united states through the los angeles airport in january of 2000. we also know that within less than two weeks of their arrival a were approached a man who had been categorized by the fbi as an agent of the saudi government, with a suggestion that they move from los angeles to san diego. and with the representation that he would provide, full support should they do so. they did. and he did. he was facilitated in his ability to provide full support because of the job and that he had, which is called a ghost job. he received a check periodically, but never was expected to show up for work. is real job was to monitor young saudis living in southern california to see if any of them were harboring plots that might be threatening to the monarchy. he was one of a number of agents of the saudi government around the world with that same responsibility. but as soon as these two men came from los angeles to san diego, his allowances jumped. now, the assumption is that he was the conduit of funds from the saudi government to these two men to facilitate
turkey's continued partnership with the united states and the nato alliance. it's part of the g-20 and has one of the fastest growing economies in the world. noting turkey's history as a majority muslim nation and as a secular democracy that respects the rule of law, president obama cited turkey's critical role in helping to shape the mutual understanding and stability not only in its neighborhood but around the world. if confirmed, i will continue to do everything i can to reinforce turkish american cooperation in support of our common goals which are rooted in the security alliance and our shared democratic values. for decades turkey and the united states have cooperated sensenbrennerively to promote -- intensively to promote the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, resolving regional conflicts, promoting energy security, expanding trade and investment and economic development, and essential and integral to all of those, strengthening democracy, human rights and the rule of law. several such strategic priorities merge in the cases of particular and immediate consequence,
to raise the u.s. debt ceiling was not enough to maintain a sterling credit rating for the united states. the political turbulence in washington apparently the primary reason behind the decision. cnn business correspondent and host of your bottom line christine romans will join me along with a panel of guests to talk about the impact that could have -- that all of this could have on our government, on wall street, on main street. how your efforts to borrow money, your credit card interest rates, even your investments could be affected. all of that, much more when the "cnn newsroom" special report continues in two minutes. to make a difference in people's lives. [ carrie ] you're studying how to be an effective leader. [ cherie ] you're dealing with professionals, teaching things that they were doing every day. [ kimberly ] i manage a network of over a thousand nurses. [ carrie ] i helped turn an at-risk school into an award-winning school. [ cherie ] i'm responsible for the largest urban renewal project in utah. [ kimberly ] and university of phoenix made it possible. learn more at phoen
radically changes in the united states because the housing collapse. people can't leave their homes. immigrants right now are more mobile than any other segment of society. they will probably in a technical sense be the lubrication, kind of great w.d.-40 that gets the gears of the economy again because they're able to move and to the third point, our disproportionately risk taking. it's interesting to me, one stat the rubber chicken dinner, i'm from arizona and i'm the son of a naturalized u.s. citizen. i'm sitting at a dinner, a fancy nice dinner. someone was going on how his vice presidents have to go through this rigorous outdoors thing where he sees the meddle of the man who i will promote or not promote depending on whether or not they screamed when they went down the category four rapids. he said something disparaging of immigrants. i said, listen, i have a client who started off in investigate malla, taught sex education there. there are people in brown and black, they were shooting at her because they thought she was on the other side. she makes a run for it with her 2-year-
but two dirty nuclear bombs exploded in the united states. i hope they're wrong. that is what the statistics show. if that does happen, god forbid, i believe that our fundamental democracy will be under the greatest attack it has ever experienced. as a matter of fact, one of the issues we're looking at in the aba is what would be the aba's response in the event there was a dirty nuclear bomb and habeas corpus was suspended in the united states, as it was by lincoln and by roosevelt? a lot of people don't remember that and don't know it. england, i was in england talking to their lawyers. i was talking to their security people. they don't have a constitution. they have much different ability to hold people for longer periods of time, and what they would do under similar circumstances. it is an issue we are thinking about and an issue the american bar association will have to respond to. >> a very different sector of the set of problems you have been wrestling with, are the problems faced by our justice system rooted in deep problems in legal education, especially aspiring -- sp
leaf sold by the producer and the cocaine sold to the user in the united states. illegality structures the marketplace in another way. one of the principal structuring features of the publishing industry is physical weight, bulk. one of the largest expenses of publishing houses is shipping. physically moving their product around the country and around world. that is why the publishing industry is undergoing such intense and rapid change as new technology devised ways to get around that principal obstacle or cost to the marketplace. digital technology and one that will do. in the drug market illegality is a similar parallel principal obstacle for the functioning of the market. you have to move the products to ship them. you have to ship them across borders in a way that is not officially seen because they are illegal. almost like you have to budget in visibility into your shipping industry. one of the principal ways to do that is to hire employees directly inside the state. you have to have people working in customs and police forces and at various levels of government in every country.
and the ability of the united states to say patience, relax, trending in the right direction. this is as it was in northern iraq and better than it was then things are going in the right direction. the what we need to regains is the intermediate tools. . . gives me great pleasure to introduce to you, greg robinson. [applause] >> thanks for coming eye. very grateful to the roosevelt library for having invited me and for all of you listening today. i want to tell you about my book and then explain more about how i came to write it and why i think it's important. a tragedy of democracy is about executive order 9066 and the removal and confinement of 120,000 west coast japanese americans into government camps in world war ii. a sent of events imprecisely called the japanese american internment. it may be a surprise that there's anything new to say about this after all the legions of memoirs, plays, document riz, and so forth that have appeared on the subject. although i learned a great deal from all of those works, after studying the question for a long time, i have come to the c
the united states faces in threes important countries. we're doing this a little bit differently today and one of the differences is that both of our nominees on the first panel were nominated last year to serve on these positions. i think i chaired one of those nomination hearings last year. but both were considered and approved by the senate foreign relations committee and both were held up on the senate floor and was not confirmed by the full senate. seeing the importance of having an ambassador in these critical countries, the president chose to recess appoint both ambassador ric -- the two men have been serving as ambassadors in prague and akara over the past seven months. a recessed appointment by the president lasts for only one calendar year so these two men have been renominated and the committee will reconsider their nominations. i intend to support their nominations once again. since both men have been serving on these rools we will hear about the plans they've already seen. welcome back and thank you for going through the nomination process again and take on these responsib
. >>> up next for our viewers here in united states, "fareed zakarka gps." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, a tour of the world and the united states with a terrific panel. we'll tackle the euro crisis, britain, riots, the united states and much more. then what in the world? should the u.s. be taking economic queues from iran? maybe. i'll explain. >>> next, an inside look at intelligence and the war on terror are john miller who has just resigned as one of the nation's top spooks. >>> finally, a last look at how not to be a spy. >>> first, here is my take. i wrote a blog post for our gps website, cnn.com/gps that has gotten a great deal of reaction. let me talk about it for a moment. it all started because i read a website that pointed out after the s&p downgrade of the united states, no country with a presidential system of government had a aaa rating from all three rating agencies. only countries with parliamentary systems have that honor
was one of the grossest insults to the united states when scotland released one of the killers. he went home to libya. he got a hero's welcome and we stand and watch and do nothing. why now get tough when we've let all these things happen? >> well, there was some funny business that went on with his release, as has been widely rumored. i think since he was dying was the reason why he was sent home. since he's not dying maybe he ought to be sent back. right now there are arms deposes that are -- depots that are full of weapons, including possibly hand held surface-to-air missiles we have to secure those depots so they dope get in the wrong hands. we have to make -- they don't get if the wrong hands. we have to try to see public billings are not destroyed as happened in baghdad. so the government can continue to function. -- we need to help them. keep government sphraoeulg goods and selfs to the people. -- supplying goods and services to the people that doesn't moon money. they've talked to me about reimbursing the united states for costs incurred in this conflict. they have 30 some billi
for tyranny and oppression but not the united states of america. the united states military has always stood for freedom and liberty and not just for americans the countless number of people around the planet. scott o'grady talked about family and freedom and those other values conservatives want to make sure our country stays strong that we need to embrace and defend and it is not easy to defend them. if you are a conservative today the press will make fun of you. i get it all the time. is the nature of the business. particularly the national press never see things the way normal folks do. you ever read cal thomas? a great writer. he had a great line when he was talking about the difference between the new york times and the way folks in western ohio might see things and had a great statement did i get up every morning and read my bible and the new york times oic what each side is up to. there's some truth to that. the national media doesn't see things the way we do and they will make fun of us when we stand up for the things that matter but just understand that. that leads to my last point
at the possibility of even allowing the united states to default for the first time in its history in order to advance a specific agenda that had already been rejected by a majority in congress and certainly by a majority in the american public. now, the fact is, in the end, as we calmly predicted would be the case, cooler heads prevailed and compromise was achieved. the frustration that we all have is that shouldn't take something this dramatic to force that kind of compromise because in the end, everyone is here for the same reason, which is to make washington work in a way that is good for this country and good for the american people. >> i revise my remarks to frustrated. >> i'm not sure -- go ahead and ask your question. you take issue with the substance? >> we have expressed frustration on the process on a number of occasions. >> the president has he learned any lessons from this experience that will help him deal with this congress perhaps any better? and does he accept any responsibilities for the quote, unquote, service that we have seen in the last month. >> i think this president
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
.s. citizen? yes, thank goodness. i want that in the united states here in phoenix to help us with the economy. that brings me to the third point and that is the notion of dynamic talent is a tricky concept in the united states. we don't know in modern economies what helps an economy continue to grow and to remain strong and to prosper as it inknow vates, particularly as the economy and the culture and the society becomes relatively well off. it is a known phenomena that it is hard for individuals who are relatively well off to take outsized risk and put everything on the line. back to my original story, if you think about the swimmers in the contest, in order for the united states to prosper, we need lots of swimmers who are willing to get in the water and swim and save nothing for the trip back because they are the type of person who will do whatever it takes, work as hard as is needed and get to the other side without saving energy to get back. and this shows up in what we now have as the crystal clear data in the last several years largely funded by the kaufman foundation out of kansas cit
united states to prosper, we need lots of swimmers who are willing to get in the water and swim and save nothing for the trip back because they are the type of person who will do whatever it takes, work as hard as is needed and get to the other side without saving energy to get back. and this shows up in what we now have as the crystal clear data in the last several years largely funded by the kaufman foundation out of kansas city and augmented by others. two important findings that i hope you take you that will augment the even more compelling stories about people and families and the appreciation of the human situation and that is, first, 91% of those u.s. born workers in the united states from the 1990's to 2005 were better off because of the immigrant, both documented and undocumented, presence in the united states. their earnings were enhanced by about 2.7%. why? it's complicated and i'll send a link to the commission so you can look at the exciting charts and graphs and do that to your heart's desire. it comes down to a simple idea which is intuitive and you know it. the e
was suspended in the united states, as it was by lincoln and by roosevelt? a lot of people don't remember that and don't know it. england, i was in england talking to their lawyers. i was talking to their security people. they don't have a constitution. they have much different ability to hold people for longer periods of time, and what they would do under similar circumstances. it is an issue we are thinking about and an issue the american bar association will have to respond to. >> a very different sector of the set of problems you have been wrestling with, are the problems faced by our justice system rooted in deep problems in legal education, especially aspiring -- spiral in student debt, forcing lawyers away from public interest -- especially spiraling stood in debt, forcing lawyers away from public interest? >> i have a son who graduated from university. i have a niece who graduated last year and another niece is considering going to law school. i have been looking at the economics of going to law school. they are out of kilter. the profession is not to be a profession just for the
>> the ambassador from kazakhstan to the united states, the former foreign minister from kazakhstan and a master to norway, sweden, and ireland. mr. ambassador, it is good to sit and talk with you. szczeszek stan, ninth largest kazakhstan, the ninth largest country in the world. what would be three facts that we should know about it? >> you have mentioned one, the size. secondly, we are enormously rich with mineral resources. per-capita, it is $300,000 per head in value. the third fact is that we hail from 500,000 years ago. -- 5000 years ago. >> central asia, when we talk about central asia, people in america do not know that part of the world. what other countries are we talking about? >> classic central asia would anubegistan. bigges you can include afghanistan in that group. china is also very close to central asia. >> does the word "stan" mean something? >> it means where the rulers sets, headquarters, if you like. >> how about kazhak? >> one legend says that it drew from a white swan. the other theory is that it was a freedom-like person. >> they were a nomadic people long ago
in the united states and ask them while -- why they are outsourcing jobs. i think the opt out of health care, and they should think twice. employers should entice with health benefits because i think it will retain good employees. host: i will jump in on that point. thanks, judith, for all of your comments. she talked about the importance of education. there was a major survey about the public's attitude toward education then it was done by gallup. another way that education is in the news today -- obama's education chief of flunks. -- for months perry -- flunks perry -- kearney duncan was also our guest on "newsmakers." it will air this sunday at 10:00 eastern time. our next call is from southport, virginia. jeffrey is a republican. caller: good morning. how are you doing? i am a republican. and my belief is that the justice department needs to be overhauled. there it is a lot of minorities, majorities, coming out of here and there is nothing for them in this country. they need a close look at this situation. this will be another way that the terrorists will come back to this country and do
and the race to find our nominee for president of the united states, let us stay true to our causes, faithful to our principles, and steadfast in our belief. we are the party of personal liberty, limited government, and opportunity and responsibility for all americans. [applause] the challenges our country faces call for more than just a competition. the challenge demands a leader. a politician is someone who makes promises, promises of hope and change. 6 a leader is someone who delivers results. in the last election, we were promised change. but the only changes we've seen are an increase in unemployment rate and a decrease in the debt rating. it is time for action. it is time for results. [applause] our country needs real action from a leader now more than ever. we need action on policies to create jobs for the almost 14 million unemployed throughout our country. action to reduce the size and the cost of the federal government that takes in $1.5 trillion, and yet spends $3 trillion. making these policies a reality will take a leader doing what a leader does. setting priorities, making tough
to move up not even the president of the united states appearing before the nation to calm them down. most investors cashing out and a correction is turning into a bear. and markets the world over are growling in unison. it is now not just us but today, the world and google chairman is worried and in moments here in the flesh to talk about it, but, first, to us, in new york, on the market fallout. in chicago, with phil on the commodity fallout. and gold flying past $1,700. and in washington, dc, ed henry and now a worried white house over what do do. we begin in new york. wow. >>guest: wow is the only word you and describe. today was the first chance to react to the brand new credit rating this nation holds and we will just say it was a bloody mess that occurred. traders were panicked and the dow lost more than 600 points and the nasdaq and s&p closing the day lower. just to give you a sense of how don down trodden, 98 percent of the volume was sold in declining stock. this adds on to 10 percent loss across the board that the markets have seen just in the last six trading days. there is no
, and prosperous. so stand strong. thank you. god bless you, god bless iowa and the united states of america. [applause] >> let's give an iowa welcome to the iowa energy forum. >> ladies and gentlemen, the following are iowa citizens speaking about the importance of america's energy security. >> my feeling has always been we are short. people talk about it. i don't think we're short on energy. i believe there's enough energy on the soil and in the oceans to supply us for many, many years, and we don't even know how much is there. >> it's very important to the state of iowa. one in 11 people of the state of iowa receives a paycheck because of the trucking industry. and the trucks for delivery of good delivered on a daily basis. not only for the trucking industry, but for everybody in the united states. energy is important to our livelihood. it's important to our economy, and it needs to be the number one priority among lawmakers and decision makers. >> what's important is if we're looking at where our source of crude oil, where we get it in the world that we look first at what's in america. m
in the united states and, cnn "special report get it done, count down to debt crisis." >> what is in the deal, how it came about, and how all the players in the debate are reacting tonight. several asian markets will have opened and others opening soon. we will take you there live. >> it has been amazing day, don. earlier today, the senate democratic leader signed off on the deal. depending on fellow democrats. nancy pelosi said she would take the deal to her caucus tomorrow, but wanted to see the final product before committing her support. >> cnn has been devoted to this breaking news story it is important to us and the world. many, many more adtwo hours in a special report here on cnn wolf. >> listen to what the president of the united states said. >> there are still important votes to be taken by members of congress. the leaders of both parties in both chambers have reached an agreement that will reduce the deficit and avoid default. a default that would have had a devastating effect on our economy. this will cut $1 trillion in spending over ten year, cuts that both parties agreed to earl
amendment to the constitution of the united states. and i don't say that lightly, understanding that there have been really very few times in which the constitution has been amended. but i believe now in my fourth term that having recognized early on in my congressional career that all of the inertia here in washington is to spend money. everything. it all points toward spending money. the budget process that we go through. the folks through the congressional budget office that try their best to do the work but the rules under which they determine whether or not something costs the federal government and this nation something or whether it saves are so distorted that you can't get to the right answer. one cannot get to the right answer without structural change. and that's where the balanced budget amendment comes in. and so today, what we did in the budget control act is not all that any of us would have liked. in fact, the numbers are relatively paltry when you look at them compared to how much money this government spends, but what is true about this act is that it will allow
that the united states of america is deadly serious about dealing with the long-term structural debt. that means putting a plan on the table, 4 trillion plus, if necessary, that lays out how we go forward. we do it, david, in a way that doesn't turn our backs on the history we have created where we know how to do it without cutting off job creation in our economic future. in the 1990s, we balanced the budget. we did it without a constitutional amendment. we balanced the budget, created 22,000 new jobs. that changed when we went into credit card debt, two wars, two tax cuts. we couldn't afford them. boom! 6.some trillion in debt. obama was largely in response to george bush and hank paulson asking us to bail out the financial structure of america. we have to get real about what the problem is. the second piece of this, senator box eer has a great dea. if we do it, we will save 600 more jobs than what the house is setting out to do. three, we need to pass the infrastructure, which is bipartisan. we have introduced this with lindsey graham of south carolina and mark warner of virginia. we have $2.2
if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come from the u
't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs available and good jobs available, but we have to first let them know what to expect upon graduation. second thing we have to do is make sure we continue to have the profession look like our society. two spots of the examples. hispanic lawyers, less than 4%. 15% of our society. african americans come 8% come away under-represented. what we are doing in that regard as we have minority scholarships and a program where we put minority students with federal judges and state judges. we have a diversity center, which are the only four missions of the
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